Home Greater Manchester Salford company secures exclusive battery energy storage supply deal

Salford company secures exclusive battery energy storage supply deal

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Independent energy generation specialist, Ylem Energy Ltd, has announced that it has secured the exclusive UK rights to large-scale battery energy storage systems (BESS) from leading global provider. The deal is a coup for the Salford-based firm as it underpins its expansion into the flexible energy market, which helps balance the electricity grid when demand fluctuates and can help businesses save money by reducing their reliance on peak-time energy tariffs.

For the last thirty years, Ylem Energy been a pioneer in generating environmentally-friendly electricity from biogas fuels – such as that captured from landfill sites and anaerobic digestion (AD) plants that utilise waste organic materials from sources such as food and drink manufacturing, farming and sewage treatment works.

Packaged into a shipping container, the company’s new battery technology can store and release up to 1MW(*) of electricity, enabling it to quickly respond when required, much faster than other types of generation systems, making it ideal for balancing the grid at peak times. With more local, decentralised power generation systems being installed throughout the UK – especially renewables such as solar PV and wind – there can be fluctuations in output, which need to be managed and battery systems can help match production with demand – especially when they happen at different times of the day.

Ian Gadsby, managing director, commented: “We’re really delighted to secure this deal for the supply of battery energy storage systems, our partner is a global player and its systems are cutting edge, which will be a big boost for our region and further afield throughout the UK. This will create new employment opportunities and draw on the technical and engineering skills we’ve developed over the last three decades.”

“We have a lot of other technology that we’ll also be introducing, and this will help both the UK keep the lights on during this important phase of its decentralisation process and empower businesses to take control of their energy costs.”